Open Access
Review Article
Issue
Parasite
Volume 27, 2020
Article Number 61
Number of page(s) 42
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/parasite/2020051
Published online 17 November 2020

© C. Léger, published by EDP Sciences, 2020

Licence Creative Commons
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Introduction

Bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) represent the second-most diverse order of mammals, after rodents. As of 2007, 42 bat species have been reported from Europe (Dietz et al. [84]). According to Arthur & Lemaire [16], 35 species have been unambiguously identified in France. Many aspects of the ecology of bats are under study (e.g. swarming, hunting sites, flight routes, habitat studies, acoustic ecology). One of these aspects is the study of bat parasites, which has a long history in Europe, for instance in French-speaking areas (France, Belgium). Bats are infected with a large diversity of parasites. Around the year 1999, c. 756 taxa were known to be associated with bats worldwide [167]. In Lanza’s book, a wide range of parasitic organisms were presented, belonging to 13 groups: Myconta (two taxa), Acanthocephala (three taxa), Mallophaga (one taxon, accidental exposure), Anoplura (two taxa), Heteroptera (11 taxa), Neobacteria (c. 31 taxa), Protozoa (25 taxa), Cestoda (55 taxa), Digenea (105 taxa), Nematoda (62 taxa), Acari (324 taxa), Diptera (65 taxa) and Siphonaptera (64 taxa). This includes at least ten phyla: Acanthocephala (Spiny-headed worms), Apicomplexa, Arthropoda, Ascomycota (Ascomycete fungi), Euglenozoa, Firmicutes, Nematoda, Platyhelminthes, Protobacteria and Spirochaetes. Similar findings were noted by Stiles & Nolan [235] in their “key catalogue” of bat parasites. In addition to the high diversity of bat parasites, these findings point out the predominant share, in the published records, of metazoan parasites. They also point out the issue of diseases in bats and the issue of bat parasites as disease vectors for their hosts. Indeed, we know that bats are hosts to a large range of infections (transmission linked with their ecology) and they seemingly are able to control these infections so that they are mostly asymptomatic. Some bat parasites (e.g. bat flies) are known to be disease vectors for their hosts [83, 129, 181, 184, 192, 261].

Among the earliest works on bat parasites in France is Étienne-Louis Geoffroy’s Histoire abrégée des insectes [123], published in 1762 (Fig. 1). This book marks the starting point for research on bat parasites in France. The present paper reviews metazoan parasites reported on bats in France between 1762 and 2018, with the exception of acanthocephalans. According to the Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London [125], no bat parasites belonging to the Acanthocephala phylum are currently known in France. In addition, hyperparasites are excluded from this paper. Nevertheless, it should be noted that bat parasites have their own parasites, such as Laboulbeniales fungi associated with bat flies or viruses of haemosporidian parasites. Some of these hyperparasites have reports from France, specifically in the department of Gard (Arthrorhynchus eucampsipodae Thaxt., 1901 and A. nycteribiae (Peyr.) Thaxt., 1931) [55, 129, 238]. The purpose of the present paper is twofold: the primary aim is to summarize the large body of published field data; and secondly to inform the reader about the geographical origin of the data and to contribute to a general overview and checklist of bat-parasite associations in France.

thumbnail Figure 1

Number of studies (n = 237) that include bat parasites observed in France since 1760, by decade.

Methods

Initially, I used the works of nine authors: Anciaux de Faveaux [57], Beaucournu [28, 29], Beaucournu and Launay [37], Hůrka [149], Lanza [167], Maa [185] and Szentiványi et al. [237]. The list of all the sources used in these papers offers an essential bibliographical guide. The online catalog of the Library of the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle (MNHN) was also used. I checked all available publications on each of the searched terms including a combination of France or the name of administrative departments (n = 111) or the names of former administrative regions of France (n = 22) with one of the generic names of the bat parasites, as mentioned in I parassiti dei pipistrelli (Mammalia, Chiroptera) della fauna italiana [167], Parasite diversity of European Myotis species with special emphasis on Myotis myotis (Microchiroptera, Vespertilionidae) from a typical nursery roost [121], Les puces de France et du basin méditerranéen occidental [37], and Checklist of host associations of European bat flies (Diptera: Nycteribiidae, Streblidae) [237]. For the study area, see Figure 5. I searched Google Scholar, ISI Web of Science, Hyper-Article en Ligne (HAL), Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL), Gallica, and Archives. The collated sources (n = 237) were then analysed. I then proceeded to index them in terms of their chronology, taxonomy, and geography. The validity of all the taxa found was checked using the comprehensive synonymies provided by the Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London [125] and the Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel of the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle (MNHN) [153]. The taxonomic works of Fain [106108], Lanza [167], Neumann [197], Da Fonseca [72], Radovsky [212], Roy and Chauve [221, 222], Rudnick [223], Stiles and Nolan [235] and Theodor & Moscona [241] were also used. The bat classification and taxonomy, in this paper, is based on Dietz et al. (2009) and Arthur and Lemaire (2015). Authorities for the host taxa and parasites species are given in Tables 1 and 2. The map in Figure 5 was created using Carto-SI (https://www.carto-si.com/).

Results and discussion

Based on published data, eight groups of bat parasites reported from France have been identified (Fig. 2). The majority of the analysed papers (94%) were published between 1762 and 1999 (Fig. 1). All host-parasite associations are listed in Tables 1 and 2. What follows is an overview of all bat parasites, arranged by higher taxonomic group.

thumbnail Figure 2

Overview of the 113 generally recognised parasite taxa that are mentioned in the analysed papers (n = 237) per host taxonomic group. Invalid species (n = 22 Acari and 3 Diptera) recorded in the literature, records reported from France without identification to species level (n = 6 Acari; 1 Cestoda; 2 Diptera; 1 Hemiptera; 2 Nematoda and 2 Trematoda) and species only noted as absent (n = 3 Acari and 1 Diptera) are not included here.

1 Phylum Arthropoda Latreille, 1829

1.1 Subphylum Chelicerata Heymons, 1901

1.1.1 Subclass Acari Leach, 1817

Most of the studied papers (n = 112) deal with 75 species (53 generally recognised species and 22 invalid species) of Acari of four groups: Ixodida, Mesostigmata, Trombidiformes (suborder Prostigmata), and Sarcoptiformes (Fig. 3). A total of 53 recognised species (including two subspecies) of mites and ticks were reported to be parasites of bats in France prior to 2018. Of these, two species have only been collected from the border between Switzerland and the French department of Haute-Savoie (Col de Bretolet): Spinturnix helvetiae and S. acuminatus.

thumbnail Figure 3

Number of recognised species of Acari (n = 53), per host order (n = 4) and genus (n = 23). Invalid species (n = 22 Acari) recorded in the literature (n = 237 papers) and species only noted as absent (n = 3 Acari) are not included here.

These recognised species found in the literature (n = 53) reported from France belong to 23 genera: Acanthophthirius, Alabidocarpus, Argas, Calcarmyobia, Eyndhovenia, Hirstionyssus, Ichoronyssus, Ixodes, Labidocarpus, Leptotrombidium, Macronyssus, Neomyobia, Neotrombicula, Notoedres, Nycteridocoptes, Oudemansidium, Paraperiglischrus, Pteracarus, Psorergates, Riedlinia, Sasatrombicula, Steatonyssus and Spinturnix. Among this group, the most diverse genera reported in France are Spinturnix and Macronyssus (Fig. 3): these genera account for 30% of all documented Acari infections involving valid species.

Six more records reported from France without identification to species level were found. These comprise Dermanyssus sp. [86], Ichoronyssus sp. [25], Ixodes sp. [178], Neomyobia sp. [126], Steatonyssus sp. [152, 212] and Spinturnix sp. [133]. Three other species are noted as absent from bats in western France, namely Ixodes canisuga, I. ricinus, and Pholeoixodes hexagonus [28]. Finally, 22 invalid taxa reported from France were found in the analysed papers. Examples for this category are Dermanyssus murinus (Lucas, 1840) [101, 104, 167, 183, 195], D. vespertilionis Dugès, 1834 [94], Pteroptus vespertilionis, and Spinturnix vespertilionis (C.L. Koch)] [70].

Table 1

List of bat species and their associated metazoan parasites in France (including Corsica), based on the published literature. Authors are listed in the bibliography. See also the work titled Les parasites métazoaires des Chiroptères de France (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) : contribution à un état des lieux bibliographique (1762–2018) et à l’établissement d’une liste nationale (2019). Invalid species are listed in brackets. Records marked with an exclamation mark (!) are invalid. Records marked with a question mark (?) are dubious. They may require further clarification.

A large host group comprising the following taxa was identified with Acari infections: Barbastella barbastellus, Eptesicus serotinus, Eptesicus sp., Hypsugo savii, Miniopterus schreibersii, Myotis bechsteinii, M. blythii, M. blythii oxygnathus, M. capaccinii, M. dasycneme, M. daubentonii, M. emarginatus, M. myotis, M. mystacinus, M. nattereri, M. punicus, Myotis sp., Nyctalus lasiopterus, N. leisleri, N. noctula, Pipistrellus kuhlii, P. nathusii, P. pipistrellus, Pipistrellus sp., Plecotus auritus, P. austriacus, Rhinolophus euryale, R. ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros and Rhinolophus sp. (see Tables 1 and 2). The oldest works dealing with Acari parasitising bats in France are Geoffroy’s Histoire abrégée des insectes [123] and Latreille’s Précis des caractères génériques des insectes, disposés dans un ordre naturel [168], dated 1762 and 1797. Geoffroy mentioned the tick (found on an unidentified bat) as Acarus fuscus ovatus, pedibulus pallidis, vespertilionis, a taxon treated as Caris vespertilionis by Lamarck in the Histoire naturelle des animaux sans vertèbres (1839). The book of Latreille contains an observation of Carios on “la Chauve-Souris noctule” (=Nyctalus noctula or Nyctalus sp.). This taxon is very likely Argas (Carios) vespertilionis (Latreille, 1802). Descriptions of some species and subspecies are based on type material from France (e.g. Spinturnix nobleti [81], S. bechsteini [82], Pteracarus pipistrellius maximis [251], Myobia poppei (= Acanthophthirius (Acanthophthirius) poppei) [249] and Spinturnix andegavinus [76]). The majority of published data on parasites of chiropteran populations in France deal with Arachnida and similar findings were noted by Lanza [167], Krištofík & Danko [165] and Frank et al. [121] in Italy, Slovakia and other European countries.

Table 2

List of bat parasites (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) and their hosts in France (including Corsica), based on the published literature, with reported synonyms. Authors are listed in the bibliography. See also the work entitled Les parasites métazoaires des Chiroptères de France (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) : contribution à un état des lieux bibliographique (1762-2018) et à l’établissement d’une liste nationale (2019). Invalid species are listed in brackets. Records marked with an exclamation mark (!) are invalid. Records marked with a question mark (?) are dubious. They may require further clarification.

1.2 Subphylum Hexapoda Latreille, 1825

1.2.1 Suborder Anoplura Leach, 1815 (order Phthiraptera Haeckel, 1896)

Only one species has been reported as a bat parasite in France, i.e. Polyplax serrata. The scientist Paul Rémy (1894–1962) published in 1948 the only record; this was from R. hipposideros (Borkhausen, 1797) in north-eastern France at Trémont-sur-Saulx (Meuse area [177, 216]). The mentioned locality in the original paper, “Frémont-sur-Saulx” [216], contains a typographical error. These field data, dated 1925–1926, and published in the journal La Feuille des Naturalistes, are surprising and dubious [Beaucournu, in litt.]. In fact, this species is more likely to be an ectoparasite of mammals of the Rodentia order (e.g. Apodemus, Clethrionomys and Mus genera) and Eulipotyphla (Crocidura leucodon) [98, 234]. It should be noted, however, that Polyplax sp. was also reported on Rhinolophus mehelyi by Gadžiev et al. in 1990 in Eastern Europe. These are the only data on Polyplax sp. in Lanza’s analysis [167] and hence they may be unreliable. Rémy’s observation is not mentioned in the works of Durden & Musser [98], Ferris [119] and Hopkins [140].

1.2.2 Order Diptera Linnaeus, 1758

According to Szentiványi et al., 17 species of bat flies are currently known in Europe [237]. Thirteen species of bat flies have been reported from France and two more records without identification to species level have been found. These are Basilia (Basilia) italica, B. (Basilia) mediterranea, B. (Basilia) nana, 1954, B. (Basilia) nattereri, Brachytarsina flavipennis, Nycteribia (Achrocholidia) vexata, N. (Nycteribia) kolenatii, N. (Nycteribia) latreillii, N. (Nycteribia) pedicularia, N. (Nycteribia) schmidlii, Penicillidia (Neopenicillidia) conspicua, P. (Penicillidia) dufourii, Phthiridium biarticulatum, Nycteribia sp. and Nycteribia kolenatii/latreillii/pedicularia [1, 4, 12, 2230, 34, 35, 3841, 43, 45, 47, 53, 73, 74, 86, 91, 93, 115117, 126, 135, 146152, 154, 156, 167, 170, 172, 173, 175, 177, 179, 186, 187, 200, 203, 204, 206, 214, 215, 237, 240242, 247, 248, 260]. Three invalid taxa reported from France were found in the analysed papers: Nycteribia eparticulata, N. vespertilionis Meig., and N. vespertilionis Latreille. Penicillidia (Penicillidia) monoceros is noted as absent in western France [28]. Another species, B. (Basilia) daganiae could be distributed in France [28, 34]. As far as hosts of the bat flies (Diptera: Nycteribiidae and Streblidae) are concerned, E. serotinus, H. savii, M. schreibersii, M. bechsteinii, M. blythii, M. capaccinii, M. daubentonii, M. emarginatus, M. myotis, M. mystacinus, M. nattereri, M. species, P. pipistrellus, Pipistrellus sp., P. auritus, R. euryale, R. ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros, and R. mehelyi have been recorded in the literature. Jean-Frédéric Hermann’s record of Phthiridium vespertilionis, dated 1804, is the oldest French record of a dipteran as a bat parasite [135]. The bibliographical survey of the published data (n = 111 papers) written by Szentiványi et al. has shown that ten bat fly species are known to be associated with bats in Albania, Romania, and Italy [237]. Europe’s most species-rich communities have been reported in Spain (11 species), Switzerland (11 species), Hungary (11 species) and France (13 species). As such, France has the most diverse community reported in the literature.

1.2.3 Order Hemiptera Linnaeus, 1758

The literature provides well-documented cases for Cimex dissimilis, C. lectularius, and C. pipistrelli on M. myotis, M. emarginatus, R. euryale, and R. ferrumequinum [28, 167, 177, 207, 236, 253, 254]. In addition to these species, records reported from France without identification to species level have been found (Cimex sp. on M. myotis, M. emarginatus, R. euryale, and R. ferrumequinum) [28, 177]. The first published data in the analysed literature are dated 1961 [28] when Beaucournu published his observations on Cimex sp. in the department of Maine-et-Loire. True bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) using bats as hosts have not been well studied in France. Studies on bat guano deposits could provide data on the species distribution. For instance, this method provided new records of Cimex sp. and Cimex dissimilis (Horváth, 1910) in a roosting colony of M. myotis in June 2017 and June 2018 in north-eastern France [177] (about C. dissimilis in roosting colony of M. myotis, see also [121] and [224]).

1.2.4 Order Siphonaptera Latreille, 1825

Twelve species are known to be associated with bats in France. They belong to the family Ischnopsyllidae Wahlgren, 1907. The species are Araeopsylla gestroi, Ischnopsyllus (Hexactenopsylla) hexactenus, I. (Ischnopsyllus) elongatus, I. (Ischnopsyllus) intermedius, I. (Ischnopsyllus) octactenus, I. (Ischnopsyllus) simplex, I. (Ischnopsyllus) variabilis, Nycteridopsylla ancyluris ancyluris, N. eusarca, N. longiceps, N. pentactena, and Rhinolophopsylla unipectinata unipectinata. According to Beaucournu and Launay [37], the published records of Nycteridopsylla dictena are dubious [146, 227]. Bat fleas have been observed on 20 hosts in France [3, 14, 23, 29, 33, 3638, 4244, 46, 85, 86, 90, 95, 141, 142, 152, 156, 157, 167, 177, 200, 204, 219, 227, 228, 231, 242, 257]. These hosts are E. serotinus, M. schreibersii, M. blythii, M. capaccinii, M. daubentonii, M. emarginatus, M. myotis, M. mystacinus, M. nattereri, Myotis sp., N. leisleri, N. noctula, P. kuhlii, P. nathusii, P. pipistrellus, P. auritus, P. austriacus, R. euryale, R. ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros, Rhinolophus sp., and Tadarida teniotis. Studies on bat fleas have a long history in France and the book of Walckenaer on insects, entitled Faune parisienne, insectes ou Histoire abrégée des insectes des environs de Paris [257], may be among the earliest such works. According to the Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel, 91 autochthonous (indigenous) species of the Siphonaptera order have been reported in France. Species of the Ischnopsyllidae found in France represent almost 13% of fleas in the country [153].

2 Phylum Nematoda Diesing, 1861

In France, the helminth fauna of bats is varied, with more than 30 species. Nematodes recorded in bats in France are divided into three orders: Muspiceida Bain & Chabaud, 1959, Rhabditida Chitwood, 1933, and Strongylida Molin, 1861; and six families: Onchocercidae Leiper, 1911 (three species), Molineidae Skrjabin & Schulz, 1937 (four species), Rictulariidae Railliet, 1916 (one species), Muspiceidae Bain & Chabaud, 1959 (two species), Seuratidae Hall, 1916 (one species), and Strongylacanthidae (Yorke & Maplestone, 1926, subfamily) Chabaud, 1960 (one species). Thirteen species and two nematodes identified to genus-level have been reported: Litomosa dogieli, L. filaria, L. ottavianii, Molinostrongylus alatus, M. ornatus, M. panousei, M. tipula, Pterygodermatites (Neopaucipectines) bovieri, Riouxgolvania nyctali, R. rhinolophi, Seuratum mucronatum, Strongylacantha glycirrhyza, Rictularia sp., Riouxgolvania sp., and Trichosomum speciosum. These parasites were documented in the following bat species: M. schreibersii, M. blythii, M. emarginatus, M. myotis, Plecotus sp., Rhinolophus sp. and three species of the genus Rhinolophus (R. euryale, R. ferrumequinum, and R. hipposideros) [1921, 54, 56, 57, 68, 75, 86, 97, 99, 167, 177, 194, 200, 211, 233, 235, 243, 245]. The original description of the rare nematode P. (Neopaucipectines) bovieri is based on material from M. myotis in France. To my knowledge, it is the first published observation in the country (dated September 1885) [56, 66, 230]. The original descriptions of Riouxgolvania nyctali and R. rhinolophi are based on material from M. blythii and R. euryale in the Netherlands and the French departments of Ariège and Pyrénées-Orientales [20, 21]. A re-description of Seuratum mucronatum was based on material from Plecotus auritus (dated 1950) in the French department of Indre-et-Loire [54]. As a comparison, according to Horvat et al. [144, 145], two Nematode species (associated with M. myotis and R. ferrumequinum) are known in Serbia to be associated with bats, whilst in Croatia, these authors noted three species.

3 Phylum Platyhelminthes Minot, 1876

3.1 Class Trematoda

Records of 15 recognised species of trematodes from bats have been found from over 17 published papers. They belong to the order Plagiorchiida La Rue, 1957 and are divided into three families: Lecithodendriidae Lühe, 1901 (13 species), Mesotretidae Poche, 1926 (one species), and Plagiorchiidae Lühe, 1901 (one species). These species are Allassogonoporus amphoraeformis, Lecithodendrium granulosum, L. linstowi, L. moedlingeri, Mesotretes peregrinus, Parabascus duboisi, P. lepidotus, P. semisquamosus, Plagiorchis vespertilionis, Prosthodendrium (Prosthodendrium) carolinum, P. (Prosthodendrium) hurkovaae, P. (Prosthodendrium) chilostomum, P. (Prosthodendrium) longiforme, P. parvouterus, and Pycnoporus heteroporus [1, 57, 60, 61, 68, 71, 8689, 97, 163, 167, 177, 188, 200, 202, 243]. Two trematodes identified to genus-level have been reported (Lecithodendrium sp. and Prosthodendrium sp.) [86]. These parasites were documented in the following bat species: Eptesicus serotinus [68, 88, 167], Miniopterus schreibersii [68, 167, 188, 200, 235], Myotis daubentonii [89, 167], M. capaccinii [68, 167], M. emarginatus [68, 86, 167], M. myotis [57, 61, 68, 167], Pipistrellus kuhlii [86], P. pipistrellus [57, 60, 61, 68, 86, 97, 163, 167, 235], Plecotus auritus [86, 167], P. austriacus [68, 167], Rhinolophus euryale [68, 167], R. ferrumequinum [68, 8688, 167, 188, 200, 243], and R. hipposideros [68, 86, 167, 188, 200, 235].

As a comparison, in the United Kingdom, Lord et al. [181, 182] noted four trematode species and one trematode identified to genus-level in bats. In Serbia, Horvat et al. [144, 145] noted a total of seven trematode taxa associated with bats, and only one species in Croatia. According to the Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel, 28 species of the family Lecithodendriidae and 27 species of the family Plagiorchiidae have been reported in France. Species of the Lecithodendriidae found in bats represent almost 46% of the family [153]. The observations on Mesotretes peregrinus (Braun, 1900), published by Combes & Clerc, Dubois and Matskási [68, 88, 188], are of particular interest since this is the only species of the family Mesotretidae reported in Europe [125, 153]. As regards Plagiorchis vespertilionis (O.F. Müller, 1784) [68, 8689, 200, 235], it is worth noting that this species is the only member of the family Plagiorchiidae reported from bats in France. According to Lanza [167], 18 taxa of the Plagiorchiidae family have been reported worldwide. The Histoire naturelle des helminthes ou vers intestinaux (1845) by Félix Dujardin (1801–1860) appears to be the earliest French source mentioning bat-associated trematodes [93]. The first documented reports from France, P. (Prosthodendrium) chilostomum and P. heteroporus, were published in the Notices helminthologiques (deuxième série) by Raphaël Blanchard (1857–1919) [57].

3.2 Class Cestoda

Three recognised and one innominate species of cestodes have been reported in bats in France, which makes it the richest community reported in Europe. These species are Milina grisea, Vampirolepis acuta, and V. balsacii [68, 86, 158, 159, 167, 177, 180, 196, 200, 243, 255, 262]. They belong to one family: Hymenolepididae Ariola, 1899 (Cyclophyllidea van Beneden in Braun, 1900 order). In addition to these species, one cestode identified to genus-level has been reported (Vampirolepis sp.) [86]. The description of H. balsacii is based on material from Myotis bechsteinii and Eptesicus serotinus from north-eastern France collected by the naturalist Henri Heim de Balsac (1899–1979) at a place called Buré d’Orval in Allondrelle-la-Malmaison [158, 159]. Some authors have noted that the observation was made at “Buré” ([158] see also [142]). Joyeux & Baer’s paper on cestodes, entitled Sur quelques Cestodes de France, is the first work on the bat cestodes in France (published in 1934 in the journal Archives du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle). Bat cestodes are not well studied, especially in France, where the most recent data from field research is almost 50 years old [68, 86, 158, 159, 167, 177, 180, 196, 200, 243, 255, 262]. France has the most diverse community reported in the literature. According to Frank et al. [121], three species are known to be associated with bats in Poland and Hungary. These authors also reported one species in Germany and two species in Austria. It is worth noting that, according to the Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel, 75 species of the family Hymenolepididae have been reported in France and species of the family found in bats represent 4% of the family [153].

4 Hosts and geographical distribution of bat-parasite associations

Over a 256-year period, the 113 recognised taxa of bat parasites from France were collected from 27 bats species and six other bats that were not identified to species-level (five genera and the Pipistrellus species complex) (Figs. 2 and 4). The taxa are B. barbastellus, E. serotinus, H. savii, M. schreibersii, M. bechsteinii, M. blythii, M. capaccinii, M. dasycneme, M. daubentonii, M. emarginatus, M. myotis, M. mystacinus, M. nattereri, M. punicus, N. lasiopterus, N. leisleri, N. noctula, P. kuhlii, P. nathusii, P. pipistrellus, P. auritus, P. austriacus, R. euryale, R. ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros, R. mehelyi, T. teniotis, Eptesicus sp., Myotis sp., Pipistrellus sp., Plecotus sp., Rhinolophus sp., and the species complex Pipistrellus pipistrellus/kuhlii/nathusii. These species represent almost 79% of the bat fauna of France (including Corsica). The most commonly reported hosts, which are mentioned in more than 29 papers, are E. serotinus, R. euryale, R. hipposideros, M. schreibersii, P. pipistrellus, M. myotis, and R. ferrumequinum. However, the most cited species is the Greater horseshoe bat (R. ferrumequinum); 30% of the analysed publications deal with this species. Some bat species have no records of associated metazoan parasites in the analysed publications (n = 237), because the ecology of the host is poorly studied (E. nilssonii, Vespertilio murinus (Particoloured Bat), M. alcathoe, M. escalerai and P. macrobullaris). In addition to this, since P. pygmaeus was identified in the 1990’s, we cannot rule out that some of the records of Pipistrellus sp. or P. pipistrellus may refer to P. pygmaeus [41, 45, 53, 58, 142].

thumbnail Figure 4

Histogram showing the number of studies (n = 237) per host taxon (n = 34; species: 27; complex: 1; genera: 6) during the period 1762–2018.

Published field data originated from 72 French departments (Fig. 5). One of them is mentioned as a non-prospected area (department of Vosges). Indeed, there is no publication about bat parasites in this department. Associations with specified geographical locations were most commonly from Ardèche (11 papers), Ariège (13 papers), Bouches-du-Rhône (15 papers), Haute-Savoie (12 papers), Maine-et-Loire (19 papers), Moselle (11 papers), Meurthe-et-Moselle (23 papers), Pyrénées-Orientales (24 papers), Sarthe (12 papers), Haute-Corse, and Corse-du-Sud (23 papers). Importantly, these distribution patterns are influenced more by biased sampling efforts than by actual geographical and ecological patterns. This distribution map only helps to point to well-studied areas. The relative prominence of the departments Ardèche, Ariège, Pyrénées-Orientales, Haute-Corse and Corse-du-Sud compared to other departments is most likely a result of the attention given to karstic areas by European biospeleology (for instance [14, 2325, 4853, 69, 70, 115, 118, 120, 126, 131133, 136, 137, 151, 152, 154, 178, 186, 214216, 246]). This is closely linked to the success and prevalence of M. schreibersii, R. euryale, and R. ferrumequinum compared to other bat species. This prevalence could be the result of their ability to roost in the summer in limestone areas and underground sites. The focus on E. serotinus, R. ferrumequinum, R. hipposideros, P. pipistrellus, and M. myotis is the result of their ability to exploit anthropogenic environments (i.e. farmland, urban areas). As a consequence of this, these species have more contact with human populations (about P. pipistrellus, see [182]) and were the first to be studied in France (for the 1762–1844 period see [11, 13, 18, 9092, 9497, 124, 183, 220, 258, 260]).

thumbnail Figure 5

Study area and the number of publications that include data on parasites of bats in each French administrative region (department).

Conflict of interest

The author declares no conflict of interest.

Acknowledgments

One of the most pleasant parts of finishing a paper is to thank those who have contributed to the making of it. My thanks first of all to Professor Jean-Lou Justine, Editor-in-chief of Parasite. I have every reason to be grateful for the help and advice of the highly esteemed naturalist Professor Jean-Claude Beaucournu. I would like to express my warmest thanks to the Parasite journal reviewers for proofreading the manuscript and for their valuable comments and suggestions, and to Gilles Le Guillou. My thanks to my father François Léger and Jean-Baptiste Schweyer (Agence Française pour la Biodiversité), who provided me opportunities to deal with biased sampling efforts issues. I extend my warm thanks to Valeria Dragoni and to my friends and colleagues Clément Chardon and Hugo Weissbart (Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering). I want to thank especially two librarians and colleagues: Lucien Gournay, a fine librarian at the Bibliothèque Mammifères et Oiseaux in Paris (MNHN, service Recherche, enseignement, expertise), who read and commented on the completed manuscript; Ann Qualtrough (Bibliothèque centrale du MNHN, service Collecte, traitement et flux), who took the time to read the manuscript and make numerous valuable suggestions. Of course, it needs to be added that responsibility for any remaining errors is my own.

References

  1. Aellen V. 1955. Étude d’une collection de Nycteribiidae et de Streblidae (Diptera pupipara) de la région paléarctique occidentale, particulièrement de la Suisse. Bulletin de la Société Neuchâteloise des Sciences Naturelles, 78, 81–104. [Google Scholar]
  2. Aellen V. 1960. Notes sur les puces des chauves-souris, principalement de la Suisse (Siphonaptera: Ischnopsyllidae). Bulletin de la Société Neuchâteloise des Sciences Naturelles, 83, 41–61. [Google Scholar]
  3. Aellen V. 1962. Le baguement des chauves-souris au Col de Bretolet (Valais). Archives de Sciences, 14, 365–392. [Google Scholar]
  4. Aellen V. 1963. Les nyctéribiidés de la Suisse, diptères parasites des chauves-souris. Bulletin de la Société Neuchâteloise des Sciences Naturelles, 86, 143–154. [Google Scholar]
  5. Anciaux de Faveaux M. 1976. Catalogue des Acariens parasites et commensaux des Chiroptères. Septième partie : mise à jour des troisième et quatrième parties. Addendum. Documents de travail de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, 7, 546–638. [Google Scholar]
  6. Anciaux de Faveaux M. 1987. Catalogue des Acariens parasites et commensaux des Chiroptères. Dixième partie: Index récapitulatif de tout le catalogue. Documents de travail de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, 7, 1028–1128. [Google Scholar]
  7. Anciaux de Faveaux M. 1987. Catalogue des Acariens parasites et commensaux des Chiroptères. Neuvième partie: mise à jour des troisième et quatrième parties. Documents de travail de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, 7, 372–1027. [Google Scholar]
  8. André M. 1930. Communications. Une espèce de Thrombicula [Acarien] non encore signalée en France. Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 15, 237–239. [Google Scholar]
  9. André M. 1932. Nouvelles observations sur les Thrombicula (Acariens). Archivio Zoologico Italiano, 16(3–4), 1355–1362. [Google Scholar]
  10. André M. 1933. Une espèce de Thrombicula autumnalis Shaw ou T. russica Oud. ? [Acariens]. Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 38, 154–156. [Google Scholar]
  11. Anonyme. 1845. Acari, Reports on the Progress of Zoology and Botany. 1841–1842. The Ray Society: Edinburgh. 514 p. (pp. 267–269). [Google Scholar]
  12. Anonyme. 1938. Procès-verbaux des séances d’octobre 1938. Section entomologique. Séance du 19 octobre. Bulletin Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 7(9), 241–244. [Google Scholar]
  13. Anonyme. 1842. Séance du 3 août 1842. Annales de la Société Entomologique de France, 11, XXXIV–XLIX. [Google Scholar]
  14. Ariagno D. 1973. Observations sur une colonie de petits et de grands murins (Myotis oxygnatus et Myotis myotis). Annales de Spéléologie, 28(1), 125–130. [Google Scholar]
  15. Arthur DR. 1956. The Ixodes ticks of Chiroptera (Ixodoidea, Ixodidae). Journal of Parasitology, 4(1), 180–196. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  16. Arthur L, Lemaire M. 2015. Les Chauves-souris de France, Belgique, Luxembourg et Suisse. Biotope and Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle publishers: Mèze and Paris. 544 p. [Google Scholar]
  17. Artois M, Hamon B, Léger F, Schwaab F. 1986. Contribution à l’étude du Petit rhinolophe en Lorraine Cas particulier d’une colonie de mise-bas dans le Toulois. Rapport final, Groupe d’Étude des Mammifères de Lorraine (GEML) and Parc Naturel Régional de Lorraine (PNRL) Report, 64 p. [Google Scholar]
  18. Audouin JV. 1832. Lettres pour servir de matériaux à l’histoire des Insectes. Première Lettre, contenant des Recherches sur quelques Araignées parasites des genres Ptéropte, Caris, Argas et Ixode, adressée à M. Léon Dufour, correspondant de l’Institut. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, 25, 401–425. [Google Scholar]
  19. Bain O. 1967. Diversité et étroite spécificité parasitaire des filaires de chauves-souris, confondues sous le nom de Litomosa filaria (van Beneden, 1872). Bulletin du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 2nd serie, 38, 928–939. [Google Scholar]
  20. Bain O, Chabaud A-G. 1968. Description de Riouxgolvania rhinolophi n. g., n. sp., Nématode parasite de Rhinolophe, montrant les affinités entre Muspiceoidea et Mermithoidea. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 43(1), 45–50. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  21. Bain O, Chabaud A-G. 1979. Sur les Muspiceidae (Nematoda-Dorylaimina). Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 54(2), 207–225. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  22. Balazuc J. 1971. Notes sur les Laboulbéniales. III : Rectifications, synonymies et mises au point (suite). Bulletin Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 40(7), 211–216. [Google Scholar]
  23. Balazuc J, Dresco E, Henrot H, Nègre J. 1951. Biologie des carrières souterraines de la région parisienne. Vie et Milieu, 2, 301–334. [Google Scholar]
  24. Balazuc J, de Miré P, Sigwalt J. 1954. Sixième, septième et huitième campagnes biospéologiques dans le Vivarais (août 1951, mai 1952, mai 1953). Bulletin Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 23(5), 138–143. [Google Scholar]
  25. Balazuc J, de Miré P, Sigwalt J, Théodoridès J. 1951. Trois campagnes biospéléogiques dans le Bas-Vivarais (Avril 1949-Décembre 1949, Juin-Juillet-Août 1950). Bulletin Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 20(8), 187–192. [Google Scholar]
  26. Balcells E. 1955. Datos para el estudio de la fauna pupípara de los quirópteros en España. Revista de Ciencias, 5(1), 283–308. [Google Scholar]
  27. Beaucournu J-C, Beaucournu-Saguez F, Guiguen C. 1985. Nouvelles données sur les Diptères pupipares (Hippoboscidae et Streblidae) de la sous-région méditerranéenne occidentale. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 85(3), 311–327. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  28. Beaucournu J-C. 1961. Ectoparasites des Chiroptères de l’Ouest de la France 1re partie Ixodoïdés – Cimicides et Nyctéribiidés. Bulletin de la Société Scientifique de Bretagne, 26, 315–338. [Google Scholar]
  29. Beaucournu J-C. 1962. Ectoparasites des Chiroptères de l’Ouest de la France 2e partie Siphonaptères – Hôtes et biotopes. Bulletin de la Société Scientifique de Bretagne, 26, 315–338. [Google Scholar]
  30. Beaucournu J-C. 1962. Nouvelles captures de Nycteribiidae (Diptera, Pupipara) en France. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 37(3), 366–373. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  31. Beaucournu J-C. 1966. Sur quelques Ixodoidea (Acarina) paléarctiques inféodés aux micro-Chiroptères. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 41(5), 495–502. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  32. Beaucournu J-C. 1967. Contribution à la connaissance de la biologie d’Ixodes (Eschatocephalus) vespertilionis Koch 1844 et d’Ixodes (Pomerantzevella) simplex Neumann 1906 (Acarina, Ixodoidea), parasites des Chiroptères. Annales de Spéléologie, 22(3), 543–580. [Google Scholar]
  33. Beaucournu J-C. 1968. Catalogue provisoire des Siphonaptères de la faune française. Annales de la Société Entomologique de France, nouvelle série, 4(3), 615–635. [Google Scholar]
  34. Beaucournu J-C. 1972. Seconde capture en France de Basilia italica Theodor, 1954, (Diptera, Nycteribiidae). Présence en Anjou. Bulletin de la Société Scientifique de Bretagne, 47, 119–122. [Google Scholar]
  35. Beaucournu J-C. 1985. Insectes parasites et mammifères ou de l’entente cordiale à la guerre totale. Arvicola, 2(2), 71–75. [Google Scholar]
  36. Beaucournu J-C, Gosalbez J. 1975. Contribution à l’étude des Siphonaptères de Catalogne française et espagnole. Vie et Milieu, 35(1), série C, 69–86. [Google Scholar]
  37. Beaucournu J-C, Launay H. 1990. Les puces de France et du Bassin méditerranéen occidental. Collection Faune de France, number 76. Fédération Française des Sociétés des Sciences Naturelles : Paris. p. 550. [Google Scholar]
  38. Beaucournu J-C, Matile L. 1958. Contribution à l’inventaire faunistique des cavités souterraines de l’Ouest de la France. Bulletin de la Société des Sciences Naturelles de l’Ouest de la France, 54, 5–16. [Google Scholar]
  39. Beaucournu J-C, Matile L. 1963. Contribution à l’inventaire faunistique des cavités souterraines de l’Ouest de la France. Annales de Spéléologie, 18(3), 343–357. [Google Scholar]
  40. Beaucournu J-C, Noblet J-F. 1985. Une Nyctéribie (Diptera, Pupipara) nouvelle pour la faune française: présence de Basilia mediterranea Hůrka, 1970 en Corse. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 60(5), 635–638. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  41. Beaucournu J-C, Noblet J-F. 1994. Présence en France continentale de Basilia mediterranea Hůrka, 1970 (Diptera, Nycteribiidae). Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 99(4), 397–400. [Google Scholar]
  42. Beaucournu J-C, Noblet J-F. 1995. Confirmation de la présence en France de la puce Ischnopsyllus (I.) elongatus (Curtis, 1932) (Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae). Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 10, 413–414. [Google Scholar]
  43. Beaucournu J-C, Noblet J-F. 1996. Les diptères pupipares parasites de chauves-souris dans les Alpes et les Préalpes françaises (Diptera, Streblidae et Nycteribiidae). Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 101(3), 235–240. [Google Scholar]
  44. Beaucournu J-C, Noblet J-F. 1998. Les puces de chauves-souris dans les Alpes et les Pré-Alpes françaises (Insecta – Siphonaptera – Ischnopsyllidae). Le Rhinolophe, 13, 29–34. [Google Scholar]
  45. Beaucournu J-C, Noblet J-F, Gilot B, Degeilh B. 1999. Les Tiques de Chauves-souris dans les Alpes et les Préalpes françaises (Acarina, Ixodidae et Argasidae). Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 104(3), 299–306. [Google Scholar]
  46. Beaucournu J-C, Rault B. 1962. Contribution à l’étude des Siphonaptères de Mammifères dans la moitié orientale des Pyrénées. Vie et Milieu, 13, 571–597. [Google Scholar]
  47. Beaucournu J-C, Rault B. 1968. Note sur la spécificité, la localisation et la chorologie des Anoploures et de quelques autres Insectes ectoparasites de mammifères en France. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 43(3), 381–386. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  48. Beron P. 1965. Contribution à l’étude des Acariens parasites des Chiroptères en Hongrie (Spinturnicidae, Trombiculidae, Myobiidae et Acaridae). Vertebrata Hungarica, 7(1–2), 141–152. [Google Scholar]
  49. Beron P. 1970. Sur quelques Acariens (Myobiidae, Psorergatidae, Spinturnicidae, Sarcoptidae et Listrophoroidea) de Bulgarie et de l’île de Crète. Bulletin de l’Institut de Zoologie et Musée de Sofia, 32, 143–149. [Google Scholar]
  50. Beron P. 1971. Sur quelques acariens parasites des Mammifères et des Reptiles de France. Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle de Toulouse, 107(1–2), 96–102. [Google Scholar]
  51. Beron P. 1972. Aperçu sur la faune cavernicole de la Corse. Collection Série documents. Publications du Laboratoire souterrain du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique du Moulis (Ariège – France). Number 3, 56 p. [Google Scholar]
  52. Beron P. 1973. Catalogue des acariens parasites et commensaux des mammifères en Bulgarie. Bulletin de l’Institut de Zoologie et Musée de Sofia, 37, 167–199. [Google Scholar]
  53. Bezzi M. 1903. Alcune notizie sui ditteri cavernicoli. Rivista Italiana di Speleologia, 1(2), 3–16. [Google Scholar]
  54. Biocca E, Chabaud A-G. 1951. Redescription de Seuratum mucronatum (Rud. 1809) (Nematoda – Cucullanidae). Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 26(1–2), 86–92. [Google Scholar]
  55. Blackwell M. 1980. Incidence, host specificity, distribution, and morphological variation in Arthrorhynchus nycteribiae and A. eucampsipodae (Laboulbeniomycetes). Mycologia, 72(1), 143–158. [Google Scholar]
  56. Blanchard R. 1886. Notices helminthologiques (Première série). Bulletin de la Société Zoologique de France, 11, 294–304. [Google Scholar]
  57. Blanchard R. 1891. Notices helminthologiques (deuxième série). Mémoires de la Société Zoologique de France, 4, 420–489. [Google Scholar]
  58. Bonnet C. 1908. Aperçu sur l’anatomie et la classification des Ixodidés. Faune française des Ixodidés. Archives de Parasitologie, 12, 224–267. [Google Scholar]
  59. Bonnet C. 1908. Eschatocephalus flavipes (Koch), nouvel Ixodidé pour la faune française. Archives de Parasitologie, 12, 325–327. [Google Scholar]
  60. Botella P, Sánchez L, Esteban J-G. 1993. Helminthfauna of bats in Spain. III. Parasites of Pipistrellus pipistrellus (Schreber, 1774) (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae). Research and Reviews in Parasitology, 53(1–2), 63–70. [Google Scholar]
  61. Braun M. 1900. Trematoden der Chiroptera. Annalen des K.K. Naturhistorischen Hofmuseums, 15(3–4), 217–236 + one plate. [Google Scholar]
  62. Brumpt É. 1913. Précis de parasitologie. Masson et Cie : Paris. 1011 p. [Google Scholar]
  63. Bruyndonckx N, Dubey S, Ruedi M, Christe P. 2009. Molecular cophylogenetic relationships between European bats and their ectoparasites mites (Acari, Spinturnicidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 51, 227–237. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  64. Bruyndonckx N, Biollaz F, Dubey S, Goudet J, Christe P. 2010. Mites as biological tags of their hosts. Molecular Ecology, 19, 2770–2778. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  65. Buitendijk AM. 1945. Voorloopige catalogus van de acari in de collectie-Oudemans. Zoologische Mededelingen, 24, 281–391. [Google Scholar]
  66. Caspeta-Mandujano JM, Jiménez FA, Peralta-Rodríguez JL, Guerrero JA. 2013. Pterygodermatites (Pterygodermatites) mexicana n. sp. (Nematoda: Rictulariidae) a parasite of Balantiopteryx plicata (Chiroptera) in Mexico. Parasite, 20, 47–54. [CrossRef] [EDP Sciences] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  67. Colas-Belcour J. 1933. Contribution à l’étude de la biologie de l’Argas vespertilionis Latreille. Bulletin de la Société de Pathologie Exotique, 26, 937–940. [Google Scholar]
  68. Combes C, Clerc B. 1970. Recherches éco-parasitologiques sur l’helminthofaune des Chiroptères dans l’est des Pyrénées. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 45(5), 537–561. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  69. Cooreman J. 1954. Note sur quelques Acariens de la faune cavernicole. Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, 30(34), 1–19. [Google Scholar]
  70. Cooreman J. 1959. Note sur quelques Acariens de la faune cavernicole (2ème série). Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, 35(34), 1–40. [Google Scholar]
  71. Cosson E, Albalat F. 2007. Résultats de l’inventaire des chiroptères des massifs Concors-Vautubière-Artigues et Sainte-Victoire. Faune de Provence: bulletin du Conservatoire-Études Écosystèmes de Provence-Alpes du Sud, 23, 83–89. [Google Scholar]
  72. Da Fonseca F. 1948. A monograph of genera and species of Macronyssidae Oudemans, 1936 (Synom.: Lyponissidae, Vitzthum, 1931) (Acari). Proceedings of the Zoological Society London, 118, 249–334. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  73. Desmarest AG. 1827. Nyctéribie, in Dictionnaire classique d’Histoire naturelle. Tome 12 : NUA-PAM. Ray et Gravier, libraires-éditeurs and Baudouin frères, libraires-éditeurs : Paris. 634 p. (pp. 21–23). [Google Scholar]
  74. Desmarest E. 1867. Séance du 9 janvier 1867. Annales de la Société Entomologique de France, année 1867, I–IV. [Google Scholar]
  75. Desportes C. 1946. Des filaires dans le tube digestif. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 21(3–4), 138–141. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  76. Deunff J. 1977. Observations on Spinturnicidae of occidental paleartic region (Acarina, Mesostigmata) – Specificity, distribution and repartition. Acarologia, 18(4), 602–617. [Google Scholar]
  77. Deunff J. 1982. Observations en microscopie électronique à balayage sur la famille des Spinturnicidae (Acarina, Mesostigmata). I Morphologie générale. Acarologia, 23(2), 103–111. [Google Scholar]
  78. Deunff J, Beaucournu J-C. 1981. Phénologie et variations du dermecos chez quelques espèces de Spinturnicidae (Acarina, Mesostigmata). Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 56(2), 203–224. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  79. Deunff J, Keller A, Aellen V. 1986. Découverte en Suisse d’un parasite nouveau, Spinturnix helvetiae n. sp. (Acarina, Mesostigmata, Spinturnicidae), spécifique de Nyctalus leisleri (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae). Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 93(3–4), 803–812. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  80. Deunff J, Keller A, Aellen V. 1997. Redescription of Spinturnix punctata (Sundevall, 1833) (Acari, Mesostigmata, Spinturnicidae), a specific parasite of Barbastella barbastellus (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae). Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 104(1), 199–206. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  81. Deunff J, Volleth M, Keller A, Aellen V. 1990. Description de Spinturnix nobleti n. sp. (Acari, Mesotigmata, Spinturnicidae), parasite spécifique de Pipistrellus (Hypsugo) savii (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae). Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 97, 477–488. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  82. Deunff J, Walter G, Bellido A, Volleth M. 2004. Description of a cryptic species, Spinturnix bechsteinii n. sp. (Acari, Mesostigmata, Spinturnicidae), parasite of Myotis bechsteinii (Kuhl, 1817) (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) by using ecoethology of host bats and statistical methods. Journal of Medical Entomology, 41(5), 826–832. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  83. Dick CW, Dittmar K. 2014. Parasitic bat flies (Diptera: Streblidae and Nycteribiidae): Host specificity and potential as vectors, in Bats (Chiroptera) as Vectors of Diseases and Parasites. Klimpel S, Mehlhorn H, Editors. Springer: Berlin. 187 p. (pp. 131–155). [Google Scholar]
  84. Dietz C, Helversen O(von), Nill D. 2009. Bats of Britain, Europe and Northwest Africa. A & C Black: London. 400 p. [Google Scholar]
  85. Didier R, Rode P. 1935. Les Mammifères de France. Collection Archives d’Histoire Naturelle. Société Nationale d’Acclimatation de France : Paris. 398 p. (pp. 111–114). [Google Scholar]
  86. Dollfus RP. 1961. Chapitre premier. Liste des parasites par hôtes. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 36(3), 174–261. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  87. Dubois G. 1955. Les Trématodes de Chiroptères de la collection Villy Aellen. Étude suivie d’une révision du sous-genre Prosthodendrium Dollfus 1937 (Lecithodendriinae Lühe). Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 62, 469–506. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  88. Dubois G. 1956. Contribution à l’étude des trématodes des Chiroptères. Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 63, 683–695. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  89. Dubois G. 1963. Contribution à l’étude des Trématodes de Chiroptères. Révision du genre Allassogonoporus Olivier 1938 et note additionnelle sur le sous-genre Prosthodendrium Dollfus 1931. Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 70(6), 103–125. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  90. Dufour L, Audouin JV. 1832. Extrait d’une lettre de M. Léon Dufour à M. Audouin, sur le Pteroptus vespertilionis. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, 26, 257–260. [Google Scholar]
  91. Dufour L. 1831. Description et figures de la Nyctéribie du Vespertilion et observations sur les stigmates des insectes pupipares. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, 22, 372–384 + one plate. [Google Scholar]
  92. Dufour L. 1832. Description et figure du Pteroptus Vespertilionis, insecte nouveau de la famille des Tiques. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, 26, 98–102 + one plate. [Google Scholar]
  93. Dufour L. 1845. Études anatomiques et physiologiques sur les insectes Diptères de la famille des pupipares. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, série 3, tome 3, 49–95 + 2 plates. [Google Scholar]
  94. Dugès A. 1834. Recherches sur l’ordre des Acariens en géneral et la famille des Trombidiés en particulier. Premier Mémoire. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, série 2, tome 1, 5–46. [Google Scholar]
  95. Dugès A. 1832. Recherches sur les caractères zoologiques du genre Pulex, et sur la multiplicité des insectes qu’il renferme. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, 27, 145–165 + one plate. [Google Scholar]
  96. Dujardin F. 1842. Nouveau manuel complet de l’observateur au microscope. Librairie encyclopédique de Roret: Paris. 44 p. + 30 plates. [Google Scholar]
  97. Dujardin F. 1845. Histoire naturelle des helminthes ou vers intestinaux, 2 volumes. Roret : Paris. 654 p. and 15 p. [Google Scholar]
  98. Durden LA, Musser GG. 1994. The Mammalian hosts of the sucking lice (Anoplura) of the world: a host-parasite list. Bulletin of the Society for Vector. Ecology, 19(2), 130–168. [Nota bene : the same work has been published with this bibliographical reference : Durden LA, Musser GG. 1994. The sucking lice (Insecta, Anoplura) of the world: a taxonomic checklist with records of mammalian hosts and geographical distributions. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 218, 1–90.]. [Google Scholar]
  99. Durette-Desset M-C, Chabaud A-G. 1975. Nématodes Trichostrongyloidea parasites de Microchiroptères. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 50(3), 303–307. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  100. Dusbábek F. 1963. Parasitische Fledermausmilben der Tchechoslowakei. III. Fam. Myobiidae (Acarina, Trombidiformes). Časopis Československé Společnosti Entomologické (Acta Societatis Entomologicae Cechosloveniae), 60, 231–251. [Google Scholar]
  101. Dusbábek F. 1964. Contribution à la connaissance des Acariens (Acarina) parasites des Chiroptères de Bulgarie. Acarologia, 6(1), 5–25. [Google Scholar]
  102. Dusbábek F. 1969. Generic revision of the Myobiid mites (Acarina: Myobiidae) parasitic on bats. Folia Parasitologica, 16, 1–17. [Google Scholar]
  103. Erichson WF. 1843. Bericht über die wissenschaftlichen Leistungen im Gebiete der Etomologie während des Jahres 1842. Nicolai’schen Buchhandlung : Berlin. 140 p. (p. 133). [Google Scholar]
  104. Evans GO, Till WM. 1968. Studies on the British Dermanyssidae (Acari: Mesostigmata). Part II. Classification. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History) (1966), 14(6), 107–370. [Google Scholar]
  105. Eyndhoven GL(van). 1941. Über die Frage der Synonymie von Spinturnix euryalis G. Canestrini 1884 und Periglischrus interruptus Kolenati 1856, sowie über einen neuen Fledermausparasiten, Spinturnix oudemansi nov. spec. (Acar. Spint.). Tijdschrift voor Entomologie, 84, 44–67. [Google Scholar]
  106. Fain A. 1959. Les Acariens psoriques parasites des Chauves-souris. Acarologia, 1(3), 324–334. [Google Scholar]
  107. Fain A. 1959. Les Acariens psoriques parasites des Chauves-souris VII. – Nouvelles observations sur le genre Nycteridocoptes Oudemans 1898. Acarologia, 1(3), 335–353. [Google Scholar]
  108. Fain A. 1959. Les Acariens psoriques parasites des Chauves-souris IX. Nouvelles observations sur le genre Psorergates Tyrrell. Bulletin et Annales de la Société Entomologique de Belgique, 95(7–8), 232–248. [Google Scholar]
  109. Fain A. 1959. L’importance générique de la structure des épimères postérieures du mâle dans les familles Sarcoptidae Trouessart et Teinocoptidae Fain (Acarina – Sarcoptiformes). Acarologia, 1(2), 257–260. [Google Scholar]
  110. Fain A. 1971. Les Listrophorides en Afrique au sud du sahara (Acarina: Sarcoptiformes). II. Familles Listrophoridae and Chirodiscidae. Acta Zoologica et Pathologica Antverpiensia, 54, 5–231 and II–IV. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  111. Fain A. 1982. Notes sur les Labidocarpines (Acari, Chirodiscidae) parasites des Chiroptères. Bulletin de l’Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, 54(4), 1–37. [Google Scholar]
  112. Fain A. 1982. Spécificité et évolution parallèle hôtes-parasites chez les Myobiidae (Acari). In Colloque international du CNRS. Deuxième symposium sur la spécificité parasitaire des parasites des vertébrés. 13-17 avril 1981. Mémoires du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Série A, Zoologie, nouvelle série, 123, 77–85. [Google Scholar]
  113. Fain A, Aellen V. 1961. Les acariens psoriques parasites des chauves-souris. XX. Un cas d’hyperparasitisme par Nycteridocoptes poppei. Nouvelles observations sur l’évolution cyclique de la gale sarcoptique chez les chiroptères. Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 68(31), 305–309. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  114. Fain A, Aellen V. 1979. Les Myobiidae (Acarina, Prostigmata) parasites des Chauves-souris de Suisse I. Revue Suisse de Zoologie, 86(1), 203–220. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  115. Falcoz L. 1923. Biospeologica XLIX. Pupipara (Diptères) (1ère série). Archives de Zoologie expérimentale et générale : Histoire naturelle-Morphologie-Histologie-Évolution des animaux, 61, 521–552. [Google Scholar]
  116. Falcoz L. 1924. Diptères pupipares du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris (Streblidæ et Nycteriibidæ). [Suite.]. Bulletin du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 30(4), 309–315. [Google Scholar]
  117. Falcoz L. 1926. Faune de France. 14: Diptères pupipares. Collection Faune de France, number 14. Paul Lechevalier et fils : Paris. 64 p. [Google Scholar]
  118. Feider Z. 1970. Nouvelles espèces de Trombiculides dans les grottes d’Europe, in Académie de la République Socialiste de Roumanie. Livre du Centenaire Emile Racovitza 1868–1968. Éditions de l’Académie de la République Socialiste de Roumanie : Bucarest. 699 p. (pp. 333–350). [Google Scholar]
  119. Ferris GF. 1951. The sucking lice. Collection Memoirs of the Pacific Coast Entomological Society. Pacific Coast Entomological Society: San Francisco. 330 p. [Google Scholar]
  120. Florentin R. 1903–1904. La faune des grottes de Sainte Reine. Feuille des Jeunes Naturalistes, 34, 176–179. [Google Scholar]
  121. Frank R, Kuhn T, Werblow A, Liston A, Kochmann J, Klimpel S. 2015. Parasite diversity of European Myotis species with special emphasis on Myotis myotis (Microchiroptera, Vespertilionidae) from a typical nursery roost. Parasite & Vectors, 8, 101–114. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  122. Fuller HS. 1952. The mite larvae of the family Trombiculidae in the Oudemans collection: taxonomy and medical importance. Zoologische verhandelingen. Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie te Leiden. E.J. Brill : Leiden. 262 p. [Google Scholar]
  123. Geoffroy ÉL. 1762. Histoire abrégée des insectes: qui se trouvent aux environs de Paris: dans laquelle ces animaux sont rangés suivant un ordre méthodique, 2 volumes. Chez Durand : Paris. 523 p + 10 plates and 690 p. +22 plates. [Google Scholar]
  124. Gervais P. 1841. Note sur quelques espèces de l’ordre des Acariens. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, 2nd serie, 15, 5–10. [Google Scholar]
  125. Gibson DI, Bray RA, Harris EA(Compilers). 2005. Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London. https://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/scientific-resources/taxonomy-systematics/host-parasites/. [Google Scholar]
  126. Ginet R. 1952. La grotte de la Balme (Isère): topographie et faune. Bulletin Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 21(1), 4–17. [Google Scholar]
  127. Godron DA. 1862. Zoologie de la Lorraine ou Catalogue des animaux sauvages observés jusqu’ici dans cette ancienne province. Mémoires de l’Académie Stanislas, 1862, 355–643. [Google Scholar]
  128. Groupe Chiroptères de la Ligue de Protection des Oiseaux Rhône-Alpes. 2014. Les chauves-souris de Rhône-Alpes. Ligue de Protection des Oiseaux Rhône-Alpes : Lyon. 480 p. [Google Scholar]
  129. Haelewaters D, Pfliegler WP, Szentiványi T, Földvári M, Sándor AD, Barti L, Camacho JJ, Gort G, Estók P, Hiller T, Dick CW. 2017. Parasites of parasites of bats: Laboulbeniales (Fungi: Ascomycota) on bat flies (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) in central Europe. Parasites & Vectors, 10(1), 96. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  130. Haitlinger R, Piksa K. 2012. First record of Spinturnix bechsteini (Acari: Mesostigmata: Spinturnicidae) from Poland with remarks on the diagnostic value of some characters. Annals of Parasitology, 58(1), 15–18. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  131. Hamon B. 1990. Note sur la découverte de la première colonie d’hibernage de Noctules communes (Nyctalus noctula, Schreber, 1774) en Lorraine. Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle de la Moselle, 45, 197–207. [Google Scholar]
  132. Hamon B, Morin D. 1986–1987. Les Chauves-souris de la grotte de la Baume-Noire – Frétigney (70). Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle du Doubs, 83, 97–107. [Google Scholar]
  133. Heejrdt PF(van), Sluiter JW, Balazuc J. 1959. Suite des recherches sur les Chiroptères dans les grottes de l’Ardèche-Campagnes de 1957–1958. Bulletin Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 28(6), 165–169. [Google Scholar]
  134. Hemming F, International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. 1957. Direction 66. Opinions and declarations rendered by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, volume 1, section E, partie E, 6. pp. 87–110 [Google Scholar]
  135. Hermann JF. 1804. Mémoire aptérologique. Imprimerie F.G. Levrault : Strasbourg. 144 p. + 9 plates. [Google Scholar]
  136. Herriot F. 1965. La Grotte des Excentriques, topographie et faune. Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle de Moselle, 39, 153–172. [Google Scholar]
  137. Herriot F, Henry J-P. 1960. Contribution à l’étude de la faune cavernicole de Lorraine. Diplôme d’Études Supérieures. Sciences Naturelles, Nancy, 20 février, 1960, 95 p.. [Google Scholar]
  138. Hirst S. 1923. On some new or little-known species of Acari. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1923(2), 971–1000. [Google Scholar]
  139. Hirst S. 1927. Note on Acari, mainly belonging to the Genus Spinturnix von Heyden. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 97(2), 323–338. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  140. Hopkins GHE. 1949. The host-associations of the lice of mammals. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 119(2), 387–604. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  141. Hopkins GHE. 1957. Host-associations of Siphonaptera, in Premier Symposium sur la spécificité parasitaire des parasites de Vertébrés, avril 1957, Neuchâtel (Suisse). Publications de l’Union Internationale des Sciences biologiques, série B, 32. 324 p. (pp. 64–87). [Google Scholar]
  142. Hopkins GHE, Rothschild M. 1956. An illustrated Catalogue of the Rothschild Collection of Fleas (Siphonaptera) in the British Museum (Natural History). With keys and short descriptions for the identifications of families, genera, species and subspecies of the Order. Volume II. Coptopsyllidae, Vermipsyllidae, Stephanocircidae, Ischnopsyllidae, Hypsophthalmidae and Xiphiopsyllidae. Trustees of the British Museum: London, 446 p. + 32 plates. [Google Scholar]
  143. Hornok S, Estrada-Peña A, Kontschán J, Plantard O, Kunz B, Mihalca AD, Thabah A, Tomanović S, Burazerović J, Takács N, Görföl T, Estók P, Vuong Tan T, Szőke K, Fernández de Mera IG, de la Fuente J, Takahashi M, Yamauchi T, Takano A. 2016. High degree of mitochondrial gene heterogeneity in the bat tick species Ixodes vespertilionis, I. ariadnae and I. simplex from Eurasia. Parasites & Vectors, 8, 457. [Google Scholar]
  144. Horvat Ž, Čabrilo B, Paunović M, Karapandža B, Jovanović J, Budinski I, Bjelić Čabrilo O. 2015. The helminth fauna of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) (Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae) on the territory of Serbia. Biologia Serbica, 37(1–2), 64–67. [Google Scholar]
  145. Horvat Ž, Čabrilo B, Paunović M, Karapandža B, Jovanović J, Budinski I, Bjelić Čabrilo O. 2017. Gastrointestinal digeneans (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda) of horseshoe and vesper bats (Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae and Vespertilionidae) in Serbia. Helminthologia, 54(1), 17–25. [Google Scholar]
  146. Hůrka K. 1963. Bat fleas of Czekoslovakia. Acta Universitatis Carolinae Biologica, 1, 1–73. [Google Scholar]
  147. Hůrka K. 1964. Distribution, bionomy and ecology of the European bat flies with special regard to the Czechoslovak fauna (Dip., Nycteribiidae). Acta Universitatis Carolinae – Biologica, 1964(3), 167–234. [Google Scholar]
  148. Hůrka K. 1970. Revision der Nycteribiidae und Streblidae–Nycteriboscinae aus der Dipterensammlung des Zoologischen Museum in Berlin, II. Mit Beschreibung von Basilia (Basilia) mediterranea n. sp. Mitteilungen aus dem Zoologischen Museum in Berlin, 46, 239–246. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  149. Hůrka K. 1984. New taxa and new records of Palearctic Nycteribiidae and Streblidae (Diptera: Pupipara). Věstník Československé Společnosti Zoologické, 48, 90–101. [Google Scholar]
  150. Hůrka K, Soós A. 1986. Family Nycteribiidae, in Catalogue of Palearctic Diptera. Volume 11: Scathophagidae – Hypodermatidae. Soós A, Editor. Papp L (Assistant Editor). Elsevier: Amsterdam, Oxford, New-York and Tokyo. 346 p. (pp. 226–234) p. [Google Scholar]
  151. Husson R. 1947. Diptères des galeries de mines de France. Notes Biospéologiques, 1, 37–52. [Google Scholar]
  152. Husson R, Daum J. 1957. Beitrag zur Chiropterenfauna alter Bergwerksstollen und künstlicher Höhlen im Saarland, in Lothringen und im französischen Jura. Annales Universitatis Saraviensis-Scienta, 1957, 74–81. [Google Scholar]
  153. Inventaire National du Patrimoine Naturel of the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle. https://inpn.mnhn.fr/accueil/index. [Google Scholar]
  154. Jeannel R. 1926. Faune cavernicole de la France. Avec une étude des conditions d’existence dans le domaine souterrain. Collection Encyclopédie Entomologique, Série A, Travaux généraux, number 7. Paul Lechevalier Éditeur : Paris. 334 p. [Google Scholar]
  155. Jobling FRES. 1934. A revision of the genus Nycteribosca Speiser (Diptera Pupipara, Streblidae). Parasitology, 26(1), 64–97. [Google Scholar]
  156. Jolivet P. 1946. Captures de puces et de diptères. L’Entomologiste, 2(4), 160. [Google Scholar]
  157. Jordan K. 1942. On four new palearctic bat-fleas in the British Museum collection. Eos, 18, 243–250. [Google Scholar]
  158. Joyeux C, Baer J-G. 1934. Sur quelques Cestodes de France. Archives du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 6ème série, 11, 157–171. [Google Scholar]
  159. Joyeux C, Baer J-G. 1936. Les Cestodes. Collection Faune de France, n° 30, Paul Lechevalier et fils : Paris. 613 p. [Google Scholar]
  160. Kieffer J-J. 1908. Quatrième contribution à la faune et la flore de Bitche. Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle de Metz, 25ème cahier, 3ème série, tome 1, 9–45. [Google Scholar]
  161. Kolebinova M, Vercammen-Grandjean P-H. 1970. Neotrombicula vandeli et Riedlinia petarberoni, deux Trombiculidae larvaires nouveaux et aveugles, Acariens parasites d’une chauve-souris. Annales de Spéléologie, 25(1), 173–178. [Google Scholar]
  162. Kolebinova MG. 1970. Larves des Trombiculidae (Acarina) de la Corse, des Pyrénées et de la Crète. Bulletin de l’Institut de Zoologie et Musée de Sofia, 32, 93–105. [Google Scholar]
  163. Kolenati FA. 1857. Die Parasiten der Chiroptern. Verlagsbuchhandlung von Rudolf: Kuntze, Dresden. 15 p. [Google Scholar]
  164. König C, König I. 1961. Zur Ökologie und Systematik südfranzösischer Fledermäuse. Bonner Zoologische Beiträge: Herausgeber: Zoologisches Forschungsinstitut und Museum Alexander Koenig, 12(3–4), 189–230. [Google Scholar]
  165. Krištofík J, Danko Š. 2012. Arthropod ectoparasites (Acarina, Heteroptera, Diptera, Siphonaptera) of bats in Slovakia. Vespertilio, 16, 167–189. [Google Scholar]
  166. Lamontellerie M. 1965. Les Tiques (Acarina, Ixodoidea) du Sud-Ouest de la France. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 40(1), 87–100. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  167. Lanza B. 1999. I parassiti dei pipistrelli (Mammalia, Chiroptera) della fauna Italiana. Monografie – Museo Regionale di Scienze Naturali, Torino, n° 30, 318 p. [Google Scholar]
  168. Latreille P-A. 1797. Précis des caractères génériques des insectes, disposés dans un ordre naturel. Imprimerie de F. Bourdeaux : Brive. 201 p. [Google Scholar]
  169. Latreille P-A. 1803–1804. Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière des crustacés et des insectes, Tome VIII. Imprimerie F. Dufart: Paris. 411 p. [Google Scholar]
  170. Latreille P-A. 1804–1805. Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière des crustacés et des insectes, Tome XIV. Imprimerie F. Dufart : Paris. 432 p. [Google Scholar]
  171. Latreille P-A. 1806. Genera crustaceorum et insectorum: secundum ordinem naturalem in familias disposita, iconibus exemplisque plurimis explicata. Tome 1. Apud Amand Kœnig, Bibliopolam : Parisiis et Argentorati [=Paris and Strasbourg]. 302 p. [Google Scholar]
  172. Latreille P-A. 1817. Le règne animal distribué d’après son organisation: pour servir de base a l’Histoire naturelle des animaux et d’introduction a l’anatomie comparée, Tome III, contenant les Crustacés, les Arachnides, les Insectes, Chez Deterville libraire : Paris. 540 p. [Google Scholar]
  173. Latreille P-A. 1818. Nyctères, in Collectif, Nouveau dictionnaire d’Histoire naturelle, appliquée aux arts, à l’agriculture, à l’économie rurale et domestique, à la médecine, etc. Tome XXIII. [Words NIL to ORC]. Chez Deterville libraire : Paris. 612 p. (pp. 130–134). [Google Scholar]
  174. Lavier G. 1924. Eimeria hessei n. sp., coccidie intestinale de Rhinolophus hipposideros. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 2(4), 335–339. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  175. Leach WE. 1817. Descriptions of three species of the genus Phthiridium of Hermann. The zoological miscellany: being descriptions of new, or interesting animals, 3, 54–56 + one plate. [Google Scholar]
  176. Leclerq M, Théodoridès J. 1950. Some ectoparasites of birds and mammals observed recently in France. The Entomologist’s Monthly Magazine, 86, 74. [Google Scholar]
  177. Léger C, Pierre C. 2018. Les parasites métazoaires des Chiroptères : état des lieux (1862-2017) en Lorraine et apport de données pour la Moselle et le Haut-Rhin. Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle de la Moselle, 54, 119–136. [Google Scholar]
  178. Lehmuller D. 1967. Baguage de Chiroptères dans quelques grottes lorraines. Union spéléologique autonome de Nancy (USAN) Report: Nancy. 19 p. [Google Scholar]
  179. Leugé F. 1991. Des captures aux filets, pour quoi faire ? in: Actes des troisièmes Rencontres nationales « Chauves-souris », 22 et 23 avril 1989, Malesherbes (Loiret) organisées par Objectif nature, Dammarie-les-Lys et la SFÉPM, Nort-sur-Erdre. Société Française pour l’Étude et la Protection des Mammifères (SFÉPM) editor : Nort-sur-Erdre. 134 p. (pp. 13–17). [Google Scholar]
  180. López-Neyra CR. 1942. Revisión del género Hymenolepis Weinland (Continuación). Revista Ibérica de Parasitología, 2(2), 113–256. [Google Scholar]
  181. Lord JS, Brooks DR. 2014. Bat Endoparasites: A UK Perspective, in Bats (Chiroptera) as Vectors of Diseases and Parasites. Klimpel S, Mehlhorn H, Editors. Springer: Berlin. 187 p. (pp. 63-86). [Google Scholar]
  182. Lord JS, Parker S, Parker F, Brooks DR. 2012. Gastrointestinal helminths of pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus/Pipistrellus pygmaeus) (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) of England. Parasitology, 139, 366–374. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  183. Lucas PH. 1840. Histoire naturelle des crustacés, des arachnides et des myriapodes. P. Duménil éditeur : Paris. 600 p.. [Google Scholar]
  184. Lutz HL, Hochachka WM, Engel JI, Bell JA, Tkach VV, Bates JM, Hackett SJ, Weckstein JD. 2015. Parasite prevalence corresponds to host life history in a diverse assemblage of Afrotropical birds and haemosporidian parasites. PloS One, 10(4), e0121254. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  185. Maa TC. 1971. An annotated bibliography of batflies (Diptera: Streblidae; Nycteribiidae). Pacific Insects Monograph, 28, 119–211. [Google Scholar]
  186. Manéval H. 1928. La grotte de la Denise, près Le Puy. Capture intéressante de deux Nycteribiides sur des chauves-souris. Bulletin Bi-Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 7(18), 148–149. [Google Scholar]
  187. Masson D. 1989. Sur l’infestation de Myotis nattereri (Kuhl, 1818) (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) par Basilia nattereri (Kolenati, 1857) (Diptera, Nycteribiidae) dans le sud-ouest de la France. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 64(1), 64–71. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  188. Matskási I. 1967. The systematico-faunistical survey of the trematode fauna of Hungarian bats I. Annales Historico-Naturales Musei Nationalis Hungarici, 59, 217–238. [Google Scholar]
  189. Médard P, Guiguen C, Beaucournu J-C. 1997. Nouvelles récoltes d’Argas transgariepinus White, 1846 tique de chiroptères (Acarina – Ixodoidea – Argasidae) en France et au Maroc. Travaux Scientifiques du Parc national de Port Cros, 18, 31–35. [Google Scholar]
  190. Mégnin P. 1876. Mémoire sur l’organisation et la distribution zoologique des acariens de la famille des Gamasides. Journal de l’Anatomie et de la Physiologie Normales et Pathologiques de l’Homme et des Animaux, 12, 288–336. [Google Scholar]
  191. Mégnin P. 1892. Les acariens parasites. Gauthier-Villars et fils and G. Masson éditeurs : Paris. 182 p. [Google Scholar]
  192. Melaun C, Werblow A, Busch MW, Liston A, Klimpel S. 2014. Bats as potential reservoir hosts for vector-borne diseases, in Bats (Chiroptera) as Vectors of Diseases and Parasites. Klimpel S, Mehlhorn H, Editors. Springer: Berlin. 187 p. [Google Scholar]
  193. Melville RV, Smith JDD. 1987. Official lists and indexes of names and works in zoology. The International Trust for Zoological Nomenclature et The International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature: London. 366 p. [Google Scholar]
  194. Mészáros F. 1967. Seuratum mucronatum (Rud. 1808) aus Fledermäusen in Ungarn. Annales Historico-Naturales Musei Nationalis Hungarici, 59, 239–242. [Google Scholar]
  195. Micherdziński W. 1980. Eine taxonomische analyse der familie Macronyssidae Oudemans, 1936. I. Subfamilie Ornithonyssinae Lange, 1958 (Acarina, Mesostigmata). Collection Praca wykonana w ramach problemu MR, number II. 3. Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe: Warszawa (Warsaw) and Kraków (Krakow). 264 p. [Google Scholar]
  196. Murai É. 1976. Cestodes of bats in Hungary. Parasitologia Hungarica, 9, 41–62. [Google Scholar]
  197. Neumann LG. 1899. Révision de la famille des Ixodidés (3ème mémoire). Mémoires de la Société Zoologique de France, 12(1), 107–294. [Google Scholar]
  198. Neumann LG. 1910. Sur trois types d’Ixodinae de Kolenati appartenant au Muséum d’Histoire naturelle de Paris. Bulletin du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 4, 191–193. [Google Scholar]
  199. Neumann LG. 1915–1916. Ixodidei (Acariens) première série. Biospeologica XXXVII. Archives de Zoologie Expérimentale et Générale, 55(12), 515–527 + plate X. [Google Scholar]
  200. Neveu-Lemaire M, Joyeux C, Larrousse F, Isobe M, Lavier G. 1924. XXXII. Parasites de chauves-souris de la Côte-d’Or. Comptes-rendus du Congrès des Sociétés Savantes de Paris et des Départements. Section des Sciences, 1924, 274–280. [Google Scholar]
  201. Nuttall GHF, Warburton C, Cooper WF, Robinson LE. 1911. Ticks. A monograph of the Ixodoidea. Part II. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge. 348 p. [Google Scholar]
  202. Odening K. 1971. Das Exkretionssystem von Cephalogonimus retusus und Mesotretes peregrinus (Trematoda). Helminthologia, 10, 121–127. [Google Scholar]
  203. Olivier E. 1882. Faune du Doubs, ou Catalogue raisonné des animaux sauvages (Mammifères, Reptiles, Batraciens, Poissons) observés jusqu’à ce jour dans ce département. Mémoires de la Société d’Émulation du Doubs, 5(7), 73–139. [Google Scholar]
  204. Olivier E. 1904. Faune de l’Allier. Insectes – ordre des Diptères. Sous-ordre des Pupipares. Revue Scientifique du Bourbonnais et du Centre de la France, 17, 77–81. [Google Scholar]
  205. Oudemans AC. 1902. Notes on Acari, fourth series. Tijdschrift der Nederlandsche Dierkundige Vereeniging, 2nd serie, 2(7), 276–311. [Google Scholar]
  206. Penot A. 1831. Statistique générale du département du Haut-Rhin publiée par la Société industrielle de Mulhausen. Imprimerie de Jean Risler et Compagnie : Mulhausen [=Mulhouse]. 482 p. [Google Scholar]
  207. Péricart J. 1972. Hémiptères Anthocoridae, Cimicidae et Microphysidae de l’Ouest-Paléarctique. Collection Faune de l’Europe et du Bassin méditerranéen, number 7. Masson et Compagnie and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) : Paris. 406 p. [Google Scholar]
  208. Pinichpongse S. 1963. A review of the Chirodiscinae with descriptions of new taxa (Acarina, Listrophoridae) (Part two). Acarologia, 5(2), 266–278. [Google Scholar]
  209. Pocora I, Ševčík M, Uhrin M, Bashta AT, Pocora V. 2013. Morphometric notes and nymphal stages description of mite species from the Spinturnix myoti group (Mesostigmata: Spinturnicidae) from Romania and Ukraine. International Journal of Acarology, 39(2), 153–159. [Google Scholar]
  210. Prasad V. 1969. Bat Mites (Acarina: Spinturnicidae) mainly from south-east Asia and the Pacific Region. Acarologia, 11(4), 657–677. [Google Scholar]
  211. Quentin JC. 1969. Essai de classification des Nématodes Rictulaires. Mémoires du Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, nouvelle série, série A. Zoologie, 54(2), 55–115. [Google Scholar]
  212. Radovsky FJ. 1967. The Macronyssidae and Laelapidae (Acarina: Mesostigmata) parasitic on bats. University of California Publications in Entomology, 46, 1–288. [Google Scholar]
  213. Rageau J. 1972. Répartition géographique et rôle pathogène des tiques (Acariens: Argasidae et Ixodidae) en France. Wladomości Parazytologiczne, 18(4–6), 707–719. [Google Scholar]
  214. Rémy P. 1927. Sur la faune des grottes de Sainte-Reine, près de Pierre-la-Treiche (Meurthe-et-Moselle). Bulletin Bi-Mensuel de la Société Linnéenne de Lyon, 6(15), 118–120. [Google Scholar]
  215. Rémy P. 1932. Contribution à l’étude de la faune cavernicole en Lorraine. Les Grottes de Sainte Reine. Bulletin de la Société d’Histoire Naturelle de la Moselle, 33, 55–71. [Google Scholar]
  216. Rémy P. 1948. Installation d’un Anoploure sur une chauve-souris. La Feuille des Naturalistes, 3(9–10), 97. [Google Scholar]
  217. Rollinat R, Trouessart ÉL. 1896. Sur la reproduction des chauves-souris. Le Vespertilion murin. Mémoires de la Société Zoologique de France, 9, 214–240. [Google Scholar]
  218. Rollinat R, Trouessart ÉL. 1897. Sur la reproduction des chauves-souris. II. Les Rhinolophes et Note sur leurs parasites épizoïques. Mémoires de la Société Zoologique de France, 10, 114–138. [Google Scholar]
  219. Rothschild C. 1910. Liste des Siphonaptera du Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris, accompagnée de descriptions d’espèces nouvelles. Annales des Sciences Naturelles, Zoologie, 12, 203–216. [Google Scholar]
  220. Rousseau E. 1839. Mémoire zoologique et anatomique sur la Chauve-souris commune dite Murin, ayant principalement rapport à la première et à la seconde dentition de ce Chéiroptère. Magasin de Zoologie, d’Anatomie Comparée et de Paléontologie, troisième livraison, 1839, première section. 1–47 + 9 plates. [Google Scholar]
  221. Roy L, Chauve C. 2007. Historical review of the genus Dermanyssus Dugès, 1834 (Acari: Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae). Parasite, 14, 87–100. [CrossRef] [EDP Sciences] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  222. Roy L, Chauve C. 2009. The genus Dermanyssus (Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae): History and species characterization, in Trends in Acarology: Proceedings of the 12th International Congress Held from 21–26 August 2006 in Amsterdam. Sabelis MW, Bruin J, Editors. Springer: Dordrecht. 566 p. [Google Scholar]
  223. Rudnick A. 1960. A revision of the mites of the family of Spinturnicidae (Acarina). University of California Publications in Entomology, 17(2), 157–284. [Google Scholar]
  224. Rupp D, Zahn A, Ludwig P. 2004. Actual records of bats ectoparasites in Bavaria (Germany). Spixiana, 27(2), 185–190. [Google Scholar]
  225. Sachanowicz K, Ciechanowski M, Piksa K. 2017. Spinturnix dasycnemi (Acari: Spinturnicidae) – a poorly known Palaearctic bat mite: first records in Poland and morphometric separation from two other species of the myoti group. Annals of Parasitology, 63(1), 49–56. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  226. Schaik J (van), Kerth G, Bruyndonckx N, Christe P. 2014. The effect of host social system on parasite population genetic structure: comparative population genetics of two ectoparasitic mites and their bat hosts. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 14, 18. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  227. Séguy E. 1938. Les Puces de la région de Fontainebleau et de la Vallée du Loing [Aphinaptera]. Travaux des Naturalistes de la Vallée du Loing, 9, 5–36. [Google Scholar]
  228. Séguy E. 1944. Insectes ectoparasites (Mallophages, Anoploures, Siphonaptères). Collection Faune de France de la Fédération Française des Sociétés de Sciences Naturelles, Office Central de Faunistique : Paris. 684 p. [Google Scholar]
  229. Senevet G. 1937. Ixodidés. Collection Faune de France de la Fédération Française des Sociétés de Sciences Naturelles. Office Central de Faunistique. Paul Lechevalier et fils : Paris. 104 p. [Google Scholar]
  230. Simões MB, Moreira NIB, Leite YLR. 2019. First record of Pterygodermatites (Pterygodermatites) (Nematoda: Rictulariidae) in South America, with the description of a new species from the Atlantic Forest, southeast Brazil. Zootaxa, 4629(1), 96–108. [Google Scholar]
  231. Skuratowicz W. 1967. Klucze do Oznaczania owadow Polski. Czesc XXIX Pchly. Siphonaptera (Aphinaptera). Panstwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe : Warszawa (Warsaw). 684 p. [Google Scholar]
  232. Société Entomologique de France. 1895. M. le Docteur Trouessart communique (en collaboration avec M. le Professeur G. Canestrini, de Padoue) la diagnose d’une espèce nouvelle de Sarcoptide pilicole (Listrophorinae). Bulletin des Séances et Bulletin Bibliographique de la Société Entomologique de France, 1, XXXVIII–XXXIX. [Google Scholar]
  233. Sonsino P. 1887–1889. Notize elmintologiche. Atti della Società Toscana di Scienze Naturali. Processi Verbali, 6, 113–131. [Google Scholar]
  234. Stefka J, Hypsa V. 2008. Host specificity and genealogy of the louse Polyplax serrata on field mice, Apodemus species: a case of parasite duplication or colonization? International Journal for Parasitology, 38(6), 731–741. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  235. Stiles CW, Nolan MO. 1931. Key catalogue of parasites reported for chiroptera (bats) with their Possible Public Health Importance. National Institute of Health Bulletin (December 1930), 155, 603–742. [Google Scholar]
  236. Streito J-C. 2003. Collaboration. Punaises et chiroptères. L’Envol des Chiros, 7, 15. [Google Scholar]
  237. Szentiványi T, Estók P, Földvári M. 2016. Checklist of host associations of European bat flies (Diptera: Nycteribiidae, Streblidae). Zootaxa, 4205(2), 101–126. [Google Scholar]
  238. Szentivanyi T, Glaizot O, Christe P. 2019. Bat flies and their microparasites: current knowledge and distribution. Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 6, 115. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  239. Tétry A. 1938. Contribution à l’étude de la faune de l’Est de la France (Lorraine). Thèse de Sciences, Imprimerie Georges Thomas: Nancy. 453 p. [Google Scholar]
  240. Theodor O. 1954. [Part 66a.] Nycteribiidae, in: Lindner E. Die Fliegen der palaearktischen Region. Lieferung 174. E. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung (Erwin Nägele) : Stuttgart. . 44 p. [Google Scholar]
  241. Theodor O, Moscona A. 1954. On the bat parasites in Palestine I. Nycteribiidae, Streblidae, Hemiptera, Siphonaptera. Parasitology, 44(1–2), 157–245. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  242. Théodoridès J. 1953. Première contribution à l’étude des ectoparasites de vertébrés des Pyrénées-Orientales. Vie et Milieu, 4(4), 753–756. [Google Scholar]
  243. Timon-David J. 1964. Contribution à la connaissance des helminthes du Rhinolophe fer à cheval en Provence. Vie et Milieu, 15, 139–151. [Google Scholar]
  244. Tiraboschi C. 1904. Les rats, les souris et leurs parasites cutanés dans leurs rapports avec la propagation de la peste bubonique. Archives de Parasitologie, 8(2), 161–349. [Google Scholar]
  245. Tkach V, Swiderski Z. 1996. Scanning electron microscopy of the rare nematode species Pterygodermatites bovieri (Nematode, Rictatuliriidae) parasite of bats. Folia Parasitologica, 34, 301–304. [Google Scholar]
  246. Trägårdh I. 1911–1912. Acari (1ère série). Biospeologica XXII (avec pl. XVIII à XXIV). Archives de Zoologie et Générale, cinquième série, 8(7), 519–620. [Google Scholar]
  247. Trouessart ÉL. 1880. Note sur deux espèces de Chauves-Souris nouvelles pour la faune de Maine-et-Loire. Bulletin de la Société d’Études Scientifiques d’Angers, 8–9, 206–207. [Google Scholar]
  248. Trouessart ÉL. 1880. Deuxième note sur une troisième et quatrième espèce de Chauves-Souris nouvelles pour la faune de Maine-et-Loire, et sur deux espèces de parasites épizoaires, absolument nouvelles, trouvées sur ces Cheiroptères. Bulletin de la Société d’Études Scientifiques d’Angers, 8–9, 225–227. [Google Scholar]
  249. Trouessart ÉL. 1895. Sur les métamorphoses du genre Myobia et diagnoses d’espèces nouvelles d’Acariens. Bulletin de la Société Entomologique de France, 1895, CCXIII–CCXVI. [Google Scholar]
  250. Trouessart ÉL. 1896. Sur deux espèces et un genre pluriel nouveaux de Sarcoptides psoriques. Comptes Rendus des Séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales, 10th serie, 3, 747–749. [Google Scholar]
  251. Uchikawa K. 1989. Ten new taxa of chiropteran myobiids of the genus Pteracarus (Acarina, Myobiidae). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Zoology, 55(1), 97–108. [Google Scholar]
  252. Uchikawa K, Dusbábek F. 1978. Studies on mesostigmatid mites parasitic on mammals and birds in Japan. VIII. Bat mites of the genus Eyndhovenia Rudnick, 1960, with redescription of Eyndhovenia euryalis euryalis (Canestrini, 1884). Bulletin of the National Science Museum. Series A (Zoology), 4(4), 245–261. [Google Scholar]
  253. Usinger RL. 1966. Monograph of Cimicidae: (Hemiptera, Heteroptera). Collection. The Thomas Say Foundation, number 7, Entomological Society of America: Calvert Road (Maryland, USA). 596 p. [Google Scholar]
  254. Usinger RL, Beaucournu J-C. 1967. Sur deux Cimex (Insecta, Heteroptera), nouveaux pour la faune française, parasites des chauves-souris. Annales de Parasitologie Humaine et Comparée, 42(2), 69–71. [Google Scholar]
  255. Vaucher C. 1992. Revision of the genus Vampirolepis Spasskij, 1954 (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae). Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, 87 (suppl. I), 299–304. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  256. Vitzthum HG. 1932. Acarinen aus dem Karst (excl Oribatei). Zoologische Jahrbücher: Abteilung für Systematik, Ökologie und Geographie der Tiere, 63(5–6), 681–700. [Google Scholar]
  257. Walckenaer CA. 1802. Faune parisienne, insectes ou Histoire abrégée des insectes des environs de Paris, classés d’après le système de Fabricius. Tome second. Dentu Imprimeur-Libraire : Paris. 438 p. [Google Scholar]
  258. Walckenaer CA, Gervais P. 1844. Histoire naturelle des insectes. Tome 3. Aptères. Librairie Encyclopédique de Roret : Paris. 476 p. [Google Scholar]
  259. Walckenaer CA, Gervais P. 1847. Histoire naturelle des insectes aptères. Tome 4. Librairie Encyclopédique de Roret : Paris. 476 p. [Google Scholar]
  260. Westwood JO. 1834. On Nycteribia, a genus of wingles insects. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 2–3, 135–140. [Google Scholar]
  261. Wu Z, Yang L, Ren X, He G, Zhang J, Yang J, Qian Z, Dong J, Sun L, Zhu Y, Du J, Yang F, Zhang S, Jin Q. 2016. Deciphering the bat virome catalog to better understand the ecological diversity of bat viruses and the bat origin of emerging infectious diseases. ISME Journal, 10(3), 609–620. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  262. Yamaguti S. 1959. Systema Helminthum. Volume II: the Cestodes of Vertebrates. Interscience Publishers: New-York and London. 860 p. [Google Scholar]

Cite this article as: Léger C. 2020. Bat parasites (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) in France (1762–2018): a literature review and contribution to a checklist. Parasite 27, 61.

All Tables

Table 1

List of bat species and their associated metazoan parasites in France (including Corsica), based on the published literature. Authors are listed in the bibliography. See also the work titled Les parasites métazoaires des Chiroptères de France (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) : contribution à un état des lieux bibliographique (1762–2018) et à l’établissement d’une liste nationale (2019). Invalid species are listed in brackets. Records marked with an exclamation mark (!) are invalid. Records marked with a question mark (?) are dubious. They may require further clarification.

Table 2

List of bat parasites (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) and their hosts in France (including Corsica), based on the published literature, with reported synonyms. Authors are listed in the bibliography. See also the work entitled Les parasites métazoaires des Chiroptères de France (Acari, Anoplura, Cestoda, Diptera, Hemiptera, Nematoda, Siphonaptera, Trematoda) : contribution à un état des lieux bibliographique (1762-2018) et à l’établissement d’une liste nationale (2019). Invalid species are listed in brackets. Records marked with an exclamation mark (!) are invalid. Records marked with a question mark (?) are dubious. They may require further clarification.

All Figures

thumbnail Figure 1

Number of studies (n = 237) that include bat parasites observed in France since 1760, by decade.

In the text
thumbnail Figure 2

Overview of the 113 generally recognised parasite taxa that are mentioned in the analysed papers (n = 237) per host taxonomic group. Invalid species (n = 22 Acari and 3 Diptera) recorded in the literature, records reported from France without identification to species level (n = 6 Acari; 1 Cestoda; 2 Diptera; 1 Hemiptera; 2 Nematoda and 2 Trematoda) and species only noted as absent (n = 3 Acari and 1 Diptera) are not included here.

In the text
thumbnail Figure 3

Number of recognised species of Acari (n = 53), per host order (n = 4) and genus (n = 23). Invalid species (n = 22 Acari) recorded in the literature (n = 237 papers) and species only noted as absent (n = 3 Acari) are not included here.

In the text
thumbnail Figure 4

Histogram showing the number of studies (n = 237) per host taxon (n = 34; species: 27; complex: 1; genera: 6) during the period 1762–2018.

In the text
thumbnail Figure 5

Study area and the number of publications that include data on parasites of bats in each French administrative region (department).

In the text

Current usage metrics show cumulative count of Article Views (full-text article views including HTML views, PDF and ePub downloads, according to the available data) and Abstracts Views on Vision4Press platform.

Data correspond to usage on the plateform after 2015. The current usage metrics is available 48-96 hours after online publication and is updated daily on week days.

Initial download of the metrics may take a while.